Fleece to Fabric (photo journal)

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Carding

According to the Heritage Center:

The yarn-covered carding rollers comb and untangle the wool fibres. The wool sheet formed is separated at the end of the process into separate strips called roving ready to be spun.

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Spinning

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According to the Heritage Center:

The spinning mule twists the roving into yarn as it travels in one direction and winds onto spools on the return. The spinning frame, a later invention, performs the same process in a more compact and efficient manner.

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Bandage

According to the Heritage Center:

This process prepares the longitudinal or warp threads to be placed in the loom. Yarns are wound from individual spools onto spools and then onto the warping spool. From there they are wound onto the warp beam, threaded through the eyes in the thread heddles, and then through the reed. Finally, the beam, the warp, the healds in their harnesses and the reed are all placed in the loom for weaving.

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Weaving

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According to the Heritage Center:

Weaving is the crossing of longitudinal warp threads in the loom and weft threads, or weft threads, inserted transversely. The weft yarn is added by a shuttle carrying a spool of yarn.

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According to the display:

“The weaver was responsible for the proper functioning of the loom. If all went well, they changed the filling bobbins on the hand loom and the machine did the rest. More often there were thread breakage issues. The machine would stop and the weaver would tie up the broken ends. For more serious problems, the tradesman would be called in for repairs. Each of these steps cost the weaver, who was paid by the finished piece, valuable production time.

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Perch

According to the Heritage Center:

After weaving, the fabric is hung from a “perch” for inspection. Imperfections are marked, then the fabric is cut and dropped through a trapdoor. It is then weighed, measured, labeled and passed to burlers and repairers in the finishing room below.

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More Oregon Museum Tours

Willamette Heritage Center: Waterpower operates a woolen mill (photo log)

Thomas Kay Woolen Mill: Finishing Room (photo log)

Willamette Heritage Center: The Methodist Rectory (photo log)

Willamette Heritage Center: The Jason Lee House (photo log)

Willamette Heritage Center: The Boon House (photo log)

Museums 101: Clothing (Photo Journal)

Museums 101: Farm Cabin and Barn (photo journal)

Museums 101: Furniture (photo journal)